Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth

Two things remind me that winter is coming: teas and bone broth.

If you haven’t met with these beneficiary beverages, I encourage you to start loving them right now.

Especially the bone broth.

It turns out that your grandmother’s soup is the healthiest option during winter.

Yes. Our grandmothers were doing bone broth before we even knew it comes packed with nutritional wealth.

Fasten your seatbelts and let’s go on a journey. I’m going to introduce you to the Bone Broth, tell you why you need to start making one right now, what’s the best kind, and at the end, you will see how to make the best bone broth ever!

What is Broth?

It’s stock. Basically.

A mineral rich beverage made by boiling bones of healthy animals with vegetables, spices and herbs by your choice. I thought this option is available only in our homes, but it can be found in the most expensive restaurant in your neighborhood.

The broth tastes superb. It’s one of those traditional foods you would want to have your lunch or dinner table. Many countries around the world still consume broth every day. It’s a tasty and cheap food with high nutrient density.

If this doesn’t make you cook one, wait until you see what’s inside.

The broth is an excellent source of minerals that boost the immune system. It improves your digestion, and it’s great for your bone and tooth health.

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth
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Why?

The high calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus content make it great for their health. It supports hair, skin, joints, and nails due to its collagen density.

Some women said that it helped them with eliminating their cellulite.

Before I go to the part where you are going to find out why you need bone broth now, let me tell you that it can be made with the bones of beef, bison, poultry, lamb and even fish.

You can add a variety of vegetables and spices by your choice.

Why Bone Broth?

Because it’s warm, healthy and will improve your health.

Even though I already mentioned a couple of benefits, it’s less known that the broth is full of proline and glycine amino acids. Both of these acids play a significant role keeping your connective tissue healthy and moving.

From all the medical reports I’ve read so far, I know that your body uses glycine for the synthesis of RNA, DNA and many proteins in your body. Therefore, it improves your digestive health, boosts your nervous system to function properly and acts fast when it comes to wound healing.

On top of that, glycine regulates blood sugar level by gluconeogenesis. Those who love to visit the gym and exercise will enjoy bone broth because it helps them grow a healthy muscle and shorten recovery time by increasing the creatine and regulating HGH secretion from the pituitary gland.

Glycine can be converted into a neurotransmitter serine and promote mental health, improve memory, boost your mood and even reduce the stress levels.

On the other side of the story is the proline. Think of it as the helper because it plays an additional role in reversing atherosclerotic deposits. It works in close collaboration with your blood vessels making the walls release cholesterol buildups into the blood stream.

While the proline is doing this, the size of potential blockages in your heart is decreasing. Proline can help people who exercise to break down the proteins in little pieces while creating new and healthy muscle cells.

What’s the Best Kind?

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth
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Homemade. The nutrient rich bone broth is the food you need for your home. It’s inexpensive to make. You can always buy it in the store, but I don’t like any of the versions you can find.

Plus, there is a risk of chemicals playing a significant role in the taste and structure of the broth.

Choose for high-quality bones from grass fed bison or cattle, pastured poultry, or wild fish. Keep in mind that you are going to use all the minerals in the bone and drink them for your health. That’s why you need to make sure the animal you take the bones from was as healthy as possible.

Here is a few steps guide that will help you in “finding the best bones” process.

  • The leftovers from roasted chicken, duck, turkey, or goose
  • Visit the local butcher. There must be one in your neighborhood that butchers the whole animal.
  • Search for the local farmers. Ask them if their animals are fed with grass and where do they sell the meat or butcher themselves
  • Search online. Even though I’m not a fan of this method, some people claim they got a great grass fed bones.

The best kind of bone broth will make your family lick their fingers.

Oh, wait. You need a recipe to make one. Don’t worry. I got your back!

Here is the recipe of my favorite bone broth of all ages.

Ingredients:

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth

  • 2 Pounds (or more) of bones from your healthy source
  • 2 Chicken feet for extra gelatin
  • 1 Onion
  • 2 Carrots
  • 2 Stalks of celery
  • 2 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Optional add-ons: 1 bunch of parsley, sea salt, peppercorns, herbs or spices to taste, garlic or anything of your choice.

Before you see the instructions, please make sure you have a large stock pot at your home.

You will also need a strainer to remove the pieces when the bone broth is done.

Step-by-Step Instructions

We came down to the final chapter of this wonderful recipe.

We are making chicken bone broth because it’s perfect for winter and will help you with the cold. The chicken bones contain amino acids that have the ability to destroy mucus into little pieces.

The prep time of this recipe is ten minutes and cook time is eight hours.

Step #1: Bones

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth
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The first step is reserved for finding high-quality bones. I already mentioned the sources where you can find them from grass fed animals. If you still couldn’t find any source, try LocalHarvest.org.

It will help you find farms, farmers’ markets, CSAs and more around you.

Aim for 2 pounds of bones per gallon of water. Add two chicken feet per gallon of water if you want bigger density.

Adding chicken legs is entirely optional!

Step #2: Roasting

We are using raw bones and giving a little kick to the meat we are going to roast them a little bit.

Place the in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes at 350 in the oven.

Step #3: “Cold Water Marinade.”

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth

When you finish with step #2, place the bones in a large stockpot. Use a 5-gallon pot.

Pour filtered water over the bones and add the vinegar.

Let this mixture sit for 20-30 minutes. The acid will release the nutrients from the bones and make them available.

Step #4: Chopping and Adding

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth

It’s time to add the vegetables. Let’s chop them up (except the garlic and parsley). Add salt, pepper, spices, and herbs if you decide to use some.

Add everything to the pot.

Step #5: Boil, Boil, Simmer!

Bring the broth to a boil. Once it reached the highest boiling level, reduce to a simmer. Let it simmer until done.

Step #6: Removing the Foamy Layer

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth
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During the first few hours of the simmering process, you’ll need to remove the impurities that float to the surface.

Just take a big spoon and remove the creamy layer. Throw the layer away.

You can check every 20 minutes or so for the first 2 hours.

Grass-fed animals produce less of this foamy layer.

Step #7: Parsley and Garlic

If you decided to choose both of these ingredients, it’s time to throw them in there.

Approximately 30 minutes before the bone broth finishes its cooking procedure, add the parsley and garlic.

It will blend right in and make the broth even better.

If you don’t want to use them, skip this step.

Step #8: Cool Down, Strain, Eat

Comprehensive Guide: How to Make Bone Broth
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Remove the pot from the heat. Let it cool down slightly. Use a metal strainer to remove the bits of bone and vegetables.

You can consume it right away while it’s hot.

If you want to save it for later, wait until it’s cold enough. Store it in a glass container or jar and put it in the fridge.

The bone broth is good for five days in the refrigerator.

Who’s up for a nice warm plate of chicken bone broth?

I’m amazed at how well this recipe looks like.

This comprehensive guide how to make bone broth will help you cook something delicious for you, your family, and the whole neighborhood.

A tasty recipe is always worth sharing.

Don’t forget to use the sharing buttons below and show this recipe to your friends.

Sources:

Wellness Mama
Fat-Burning Man
HealthyHomeStead

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